Use of fluorescent probes for ROS to tease apart Type I and Type II photochemical pathways in photodynamic therapy

Maria Garcia-Diaz, Ying Ying Huang, Michael R. Hamblin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

90 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Photodynamic therapy involves the excitation of a non-toxic dye by harmless visible light to produce a long-lived triplet state that can interact with molecular oxygen to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can damage biomolecules and kill cells. ROS produced by electron transfer (Type 1) include superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical (HO[rad]), while singlet oxygen (1O2) is produced by energy transfer. Diverse methods exist to distinguish between these two pathways, some of which are more specific or more sensitive than others. In this review we cover the use of two fluorescence probes: singlet oxygen sensor green (SOSG) detects 1O2; and 4-hydroxyphenyl-fluorescein (HPF) that detects HO[rad]. Interesting data was collected concerning the photochemical pathways of functionalized fullerenes compared to tetrapyrroles, stable synthetic bacteriochlorins with and without central metals, phenothiazinium dyes interacting with inorganic salts such as azide.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)158-166
Number of pages9
JournalMethods
Volume109
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bacteriochlorins
  • Fullerenes
  • Hydroxyl radical
  • Hydroxyphenyl fluorescein
  • Phenothiazinium salts
  • Photodynamic therapy
  • Singlet oxygen
  • Singlet oxygen sensor green

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • General Biochemistry,Genetics and Molecular Biology

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