Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl) A. Gray. (Asteraceae: Heliantheae), an invasive plant of significant ethnopharmacological importance: A review

A. A. Ajao, A. N. Moteetee

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tithonia diversifolia is a shrub-like perennial or annual invasive plant, native to north and Central America. The plant is widely used in several countries such as Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, Nigeria, Mexico, the Philippines, São Tomé and Príncipe, Taiwan, Uganda, and Venezuela to traditionally treat numerous diseases including diabetes, malaria, snake bite, measles, gastric ulcer, menstrual pains, and wounds. This paper reviews the ethnomedicinal importance of T. diversifolia, as well as its proximate analysis, phytochemistry, biological activities, and potential toxicity. Published literature on T. diversifolia were sourced from data bases such as Google Scholar, Medicine, PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, and SciFinder. Literature indicates that T. diversifolia is used to cure an array of ailments owing to its biochemical constituents which are mainly sesquiterpenes. Regardless of the invasive nature of T. diverisifolia, it has also been found useful in folkloric medicinal practices as well as in remediation of heavy metals from the soil. This review provides a basis for future investigation such as isolation of bioactive components and mechanism of action of the bioactivities elicited by this plant.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)396-403
Number of pages8
JournalSouth African Journal of Botany
Volume113
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2017

Keywords

  • Biological activities
  • Folkloric usage
  • Invasive species
  • Sesquiterpenes
  • Tithonia diversifolia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl) A. Gray. (Asteraceae: Heliantheae), an invasive plant of significant ethnopharmacological importance: A review'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this