The moderating role of self-efficacy beliefs in the relationship between anticipated feelings of regret and condom use

Arnold B. Bakker, Bram P. Buunk, Antony S.R. Manstead

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This prospective study examined how the feelings of regret and self-blame one anticipates after engaging in unsafe sex affect condom use in new sexual relationships. The central theoretical question is whether self-efficacy perceptions can moderate the relationship between anticipated feelings and actual condom use. Consistent with theories of anticipated regret and social cognitive learning, participants were most likely to use condoms between the first and second waves of data collection when they anticipated negative feelings as a result of not using condoms (and positive feelings after having used condoms), particularly when they also believed that they had the power to exercise control over the sexual situation (high self-efficacy). The implications for interventions aimed at promoting safer sex are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2001-2014
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume27
Issue number22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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