The chemistry of plant–microbe interactions in the rhizosphere and the potential for metabolomics to reveal signaling related to defense priming and induced systemic resistance

Msizi I. Mhlongo, Lizelle A. Piater, Ntakadzeni E. Madala, Nico Labuschagne, Ian A. Dubery

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

300 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plant roots communicate with microbes in a sophisticated manner through chemical communication within the rhizosphere, thereby leading to biofilm formation of beneficial microbes and, in the case of plant growth-promoting rhizomicrobes/-bacteria (PGPR), resulting in priming of defense, or induced resistance in the plant host. The knowledge of plant–plant and plant–microbe interactions have been greatly extended over recent years; however, the chemical communication leading to priming is far from being well understood. Furthermore, linkage between below- and above-ground plant physiological processes adds to the complexity. In metabolomics studies, the main aim is to profile and annotate all exo- and endo-metabolites in a biological system that drive and participate in physiological processes. Recent advances in this field has enabled researchers to analyze 100s of compounds in one sample over a short time period. Here, from a metabolomics viewpoint, we review the interactions within the rhizosphere and subsequent above-ground ‘signalomics’, and emphasize the contributions that mass spectrometric-based metabolomic approaches can bring to the study of plant-beneficial – and priming events.

Original languageEnglish
Article number112
JournalFrontiers in Plant Science
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Feb 2018

Keywords

  • Chemical communication
  • Induced resistance
  • Metabolites
  • Metabolomics
  • Plant-Microbe interactions
  • Priming
  • Signalomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

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