Teachers' perceptions of inquiry-based learning in urban, suburban, township and rural high schools: The context-specificity of science curriculum implementation in South Africa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the perceptions of physical sciences (physics and chemistry) teachers on the implementation of inquiry-based learning at a diversity of high schools in South Africa. The findings show that teachers at all locations of school have a positive perception of inquiry-based learning, with benefits for learners that include the development of experimental skills and making science more enjoyable. However, with regard to inquiry facilitating conceptual understanding, teachers at township and rural schools believe a didactic approach to be more effective than learners doing inquiry, whilst teachers at suburban and urban schools favour an inquiry-based approach in this regard. The significance of this study is that the lack of resources, large classes, and the limited exposure to inquiry of learners at township and rural schools constrain the implementation of inquiry-based learning at these schools, and result in teachers at such schools resorting to a didactic pedagogy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-75
Number of pages11
JournalTeaching and Teacher Education
Volume38
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2014

Keywords

  • Economically disadvantaged schools
  • Inquiry-based learning
  • Practical work
  • School science curriculum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Teachers' perceptions of inquiry-based learning in urban, suburban, township and rural high schools: The context-specificity of science curriculum implementation in South Africa'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this