Self-Reported Pain Intensity and Depressive Symptoms Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults with Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders

Jessica M. Brooks, John Blake, Jennifer Sánchez, Elias Mpofu, Jia Rung Wu, Xiangli Chen, Jonathan Nauser, Brandi P. Cotton, Stephen J. Bartels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Older adults with schizophrenia have some of the highest rates of both medical and psychiatric comorbidities. Despite this, little is known about comorbid pain and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia research. This study aimed to examine the associations between levels of pain intensity and depressive symptoms among community-dwelling adults aged 50 years and older with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Recruited from U.S. community mental health centers, participants reported on pain and depressive symptoms at the onset of the Helping Older People Experience Success (HOPES) study. Unadjusted and adjusted regression analyses were conducted. Higher pain intensity was associated with elevated depressive symptoms in all analyses, which is consistent with other studies in the general population. Given the widespread efforts to manage pain and related mental health complications in older adults without serious mental illnesses, it is likewise important that community-based mental health professionals monitor and address intense pain and related depressive symptoms among older adults with schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1298-1304
Number of pages7
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume55
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Depressive symptoms
  • Older adults
  • Pain intensity
  • Schizophrenia spectrum disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health (social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental Health

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