Polyaniline nanofibers, a nanostructured conducting polymer for the remediation of Methyl orange dye from aqueous solutions in fixed-bed column studies

Mbongiseni Lungelo Dlamini, Madhumita Bhaumik, Kriveshini Pillay, Arjun Maity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Polyaniline nanofibers (PANI NFs) were synthesized and employed as potential adsorbents in a continuous flow fixed-bed column adsorption study for an organic dye, Methyl Orange (MO) removal from water. These nanostructured adsorbents were characterized using ATR-FTIR, FE-SEM, HR-TEM, TGA, BET, XRD, XPS, and the Zetasizer. Morphological representations from SEM and TEM analyses showed that the fibers were nanosized with diameters lower than 80 nm and an interconnected network possessing a smooth surface. The SBET of the PANI NFs was found to be 35.80 m2/g. The impact of column design parameters for instance; influent concentration, flow rate, and bed mass was investigated using pH 4 influent MO solutions optimized through batch studies. The best influent concentration, bed length, and flow rate for this study were determined as 25 mg/L, 9 cm (6 g), and 3 mL/min, respectively. The column information was fitted in Thomas, Yoon-Nelson, and Bohart-Adams models. It appeared that the Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models described the data satisfactorily. The PANI NFs were able to treat 29.16 L of 25 mg/L MO solution at 9 cm bed length. A sulfate peak in a de-convoluted sulfur spectrum using XPS verified the successful adsorption of Methyl Orange.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere08180
JournalHeliyon
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adsorption
  • Fixed-bed
  • Methyl orange
  • Modeling
  • Nanofibers
  • Polyaniline

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Multidisciplinary

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