Photodynamic therapy in dermatology beyond non-melanoma cancer: An update

Xiang Wen, Yong Li, Michael R. Hamblin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

140 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs a photosensitizer (PS) and visible light in the presence of oxygen, leading to production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species, which can damage the cellular organelles and cause cell death. In dermatology, PDT has usually taken the form of topical application of a precursor in the heme biosynthesis pathway, called 5-aminolevulinic acid (or its methyl ester), so that an active PS, protoporphyrin IX accumulates in the skin. As PDT enhances dermal remodeling and resolves chronic inflamation, it has been used to treat cutaneous disorders include actinic keratoses, acne, viral warts, skin rejuvenation, psoriasis, localized scleroderma, some non-melanoma skin cancers and port-wine stains. Efforts are still needed to mitigate the side effects (principally pain) and improve the overall procedure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)140-152
Number of pages13
JournalPhotodiagnosis and Photodynamic Therapy
Volume19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cosmetic
  • Dermatology
  • Photodynamic therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Oncology
  • Dermatology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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