Philanthropy-funded journalism: Implications for media independence and editorial credibility in South Africa

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Over the past decade, philanthropic organisations have poured millions of dollars into different specialised forms of journalism in Africa. While these new specialised forms of journalism are aimed at addressing existing gaps in news reporting on the continent, there has been growing concern over the potential effects this has on the practice of journalism. This study explores the rise in philanthropy-funded journalism and analyses its broader implications for the practice of journalism in South Africa, focusing on the weekly Mail & Guardian newspaper and its two off-shoots, AmaBhungane Centre for Investigative Journalism and Bhekisisa Centre for Health Journalism. It is based on a combination of informant interviews with editors and managers of these three entities, secondary research, as well as analysis of documents from these entities.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRe-imagining Communication in Africa and the Caribbean
Subtitle of host publicationGlobal South Issues in Media, Culture and Technology
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages193-216
Number of pages24
ISBN (Electronic)9783030541699
ISBN (Print)9783030541682
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jan 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Social Sciences

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Philanthropy-funded journalism: Implications for media independence and editorial credibility in South Africa'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this