Persuasive communication about AIDS prevention: Need for cognition determines the impact of message format

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45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adolescents were classified as being high or low in need for cognition (NFC) and expressed their knowledge about AIDS, attitudes toward condom use, and perceived supportive norms after being exposed to a cartoon or a written message about safe sex. Both messages have a positive impact on knowledge and attitudes. Theoretically interesting is the finding that the cartoon message is more effective in bringing about change in attitudes and subjective norms than the written message for low-NFC adolescents, and that the written message is more effective than the cartoon message for high-NFC adolescents. These results are consistent with the theory-based prediction that a persuasive communication will be most effective when the format of the message is tailored to people's information-processing proclivities. The practical implications of the findings for AIDS education are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)150-162
Number of pages13
JournalAIDS Education and Prevention
Volume11
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1999
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health (social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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