Not doing bad things is not equivalent to doing the right thing: Distinguishing between inhibitory and initiatory self-control

Denise T.D. De Ridder, Benjamin J. De Boer, Peter Lugtig, Arnold B. Bakker, Edwin A.J. van Hooft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

140 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study investigated whether a conceptual distinction between two components of self-control (inhibitory and initiatory self-control) is empirically valid. To that purpose, a series of confirmative factor analyses were employed in two samples (total N=577), providing support for a distinction between inhibitory and initiatory self-control. In addition, the predictive validity of the two components of self-control was examined by regression analyses with (un)desired health/academic behavior as dependent variables, showing that inhibitory self-control was a superior predictor of undesired behavior and initiatory self-control a better predictor of desired behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1006-1011
Number of pages6
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume50
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Goal-directed behavior
  • Inhibition
  • Self-control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Psychology

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