Nanotechnology for photodynamic therapy: A perspective from the Laboratory of Dr. Michael R. Hamblin in the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School

Michael R. Hamblin, Long Y. Chiang, Shanmugamurthy Lakshmanan, Ying Ying Huang, Maria Garcia-Diaz, Mahdi Karimi, Alessandra Nara De Souza Rastelli, Rakkiyappan Chandran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The research interests of the Hamblin Laboratory are broadly centered on the use of different kinds of light to treat many different diseases. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses the combination of dyes with visible light to produce reactive oxygen species and kill bacteria, cancer cells and destroy unwanted tissue. Likewise, UV light is also good at killing especially pathogens. By contrast, red or near-infrared light can have the opposite effect, to act to preserve tissue from dying and can stimulate healing and regeneration. In all these applications, nanotechnology is having an ever-growing impact. In PDT, self-assembled nano-drug carriers (micelles, liposomes, etc.) play a great role in solubilizing the photosensitizers, metal nanoparticles can carry out plasmon resonance enhancement, and fullerenes can act as photosensitizers, themselves. In the realm of healing, single-walled carbon nanotubes can be electrofocused to produce nano-electonic biomedical devices, and nanomaterials will play a great role in restorative dentistry.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)359-372
Number of pages14
JournalNanotechnology Reviews
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Hamblin Laboratory
  • nanotechnology
  • photodynamic therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Materials Science (miscellaneous)
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Process Chemistry and Technology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Nanotechnology for photodynamic therapy: A perspective from the Laboratory of Dr. Michael R. Hamblin in the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this