Low-level light therapy (LLLT) for cosmetics and dermatology

Mossum K. Sawhney, Michael R. Hamblin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the last few years, low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to be beneficial to the field of aesthetic medicine, specifically aesthetic dermatology. LLLT encompasses a broad spectrum of procedures, primarily cosmetic, which provide treatment options for a myriad of dermatological conditions. Dermatological disorders involving inflammation, acne, scars, aging and pigmentation have been investigated with the assistance of animal models and clinical trials. The most commercially successful use of LLLT is for managing alopecia (hair loss) in both men and women. LLLT also seems to play an influential role in procedures such as lipoplasty and liposuction, allowing for noninvasive and nonthermal methods of subcutaneous fat reduction. LLLT offers a means to address such conditions with improved efficacy versatility and no known side-effects; however comprehensive literature reports covering the utility of LLLT are scarce and thus the need for coverage arises.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMechanisms for Low-Light Therapy IX
PublisherSPIE
ISBN (Print)9780819498458
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes
EventMechanisms for Low-Light Therapy IX - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: 1 Feb 20142 Feb 2014

Publication series

NameProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume8932
ISSN (Print)1605-7422

Conference

ConferenceMechanisms for Low-Light Therapy IX
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period1/02/142/02/14

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Imaging

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