"let them eat harmony": Prejudice-reduction strategies and attitudes of historically disadvantaged groups

John Dixon, Linda R. Tropp, Kevin Durrheim, Colin Tredoux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

199 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research on intergroup prejudice has generally adopted a model of social change that is based around the psychological rehabilitation of members of advantaged groups in order to foster intergroup harmony. Recent studies of prejudice-reduction interventions among members of disadvantaged groups, however, have complicated psychologists' understanding of the consequences of inducing harmonious relations in historically unequal societies. Interventions encouraging disadvantaged-group members to like advantaged-group members may also prompt the disadvantaged to underestimate the injustice suffered by their group and to become less motivated to support action to challenge social inequality. Thus, psychologists' tendency to equate intergroup harmony with "good relations" and conflict with "bad relations" is limited.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)76-80
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Directions in Psychological Science
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Group status
  • Inequality
  • Intergroup contact
  • Prejudice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of '"let them eat harmony": Prejudice-reduction strategies and attitudes of historically disadvantaged groups'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this