Investigating the evolution of ingroup favoritism using a minimal group interaction paradigm: The effects of inter- and intragroup interdependence

Kevin Durrheim, Michael Quayle, Colin G. Tredoux, Kim Titlestad, Larry Tooke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the effect of structural interdependencies between groups (especially inequality), and interdependencies between individuals on ingroup favoritism in minimal group situations. Previous research has attempted to determine whether ingroup favoritism is produced by categorization or intragroup interdependencies (reciprocation expectations), but recent literature suggests that it is not possible to tease these influences apart. We report two studies that investigate how ingroup favoritism evolves over time in social interaction. The levels of ingroup favoritism were affected by categorization and inequality, and the level of ingroup favoritism changed over time, increasing or decreasing depending on the nature of the initial intergroup structure. We conclude by providing two explanations for this change: emergent norms, and changes to the intergroup situation produced by interaction. Our experiments confirm the value of studying the evolution of minimal group behavior, especially for explaining why low status groups act to preserve intergroup inequalities.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0165974
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume11
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Biochemistry,Genetics and Molecular Biology
  • General Agricultural and Biological Sciences
  • Multidisciplinary

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Investigating the evolution of ingroup favoritism using a minimal group interaction paradigm: The effects of inter- and intragroup interdependence'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this