Improving the quality of mixed research reports in the field of human resource development and beyond: A call for rigor as an ethical practice

Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie, Julie A. Corrigan

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since 2000, only 13% of the total number of empirical research articles (n=230) published in Human Resource Development Quarterly (HRDQ) have represented mixed research studies. Plausible explanations for why the HRDQ prevalence rate is not more than 13% include the possibility that a high proportion of mixed research studies that are being submitted to HDRQ are not of sufficient quality to be accepted. Thus, in this editorial, we provide evidence-based guidelines for conducting and reporting mixed research that are framed around Collins, Onwuegbuzie, and Sutton's (2006) 13-step model of the mixed research process. Further, we divide our reporting standards into four general areas-research formulation, research planning, research implementation, and research dissemination-that we itemize via a taxonomy that contains more than 60 elements.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)273-299
Number of pages27
JournalHuman Resource Development Quarterly
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • 13-step mixed research process
  • Evidence-based guidelines
  • Guidelines for conducting and reporting mixed research
  • Mixed methods research
  • Mixed research
  • Prevalence rate studies
  • Reporting standards
  • Research rigor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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