How changes in job demands and resources predict burnout, work engagement, and sickness absenteeism

Wilmar B. Schaufeli, Arnold B. Bakker, Willem van Rhenen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1288 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present longitudinal survey among 201 telecom managers supports the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model that postulates a health impairment process and a motivational process. As hypothesized, results of structural equation modeling analyses revealed that: (1) increases in job demands (i.e., overload, emotional demands, and work-home interference) and decreases in job resources (i.e., social support, autonomy, opportunities to learn, and feedback) predict burnout, (2) increases in job resources predict work engagement, and (3) burnout (positively) and engagement (negatively) predict registered sickness duration ("involuntary" absence) and frequency ("involuntary" absence), respectively. Finally, consistent with predictions results suggest a positive gain spiral: initial work engagement predicts an increase in job resources, which, in its turn, further increases work engagement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)893-917
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Organizational Behavior
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2009
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • General Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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