From Mario to FIFA: What qualitative case study research suggests about games-based learning in a US classroom

Hannah R. Gerber, Sandra Schamroth Abrams, Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie, Cindy L. Benge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article explores the impact of using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) videogames in a high school curriculum when developed through a connected learning frame by examining the influence that COTS videogames have on transforming students' literacy learning in-school. However, it must be noted that transforming literacy in school is about more than bridging in- and out-of-school literacies; it concerns developing a deeper understanding of the meaning of literacy in today's multimediated world, and the ways that these experiences are connected not only to media, but to traditional texts, peers, and guiding teachers, so that we can better grasp how to harness new learning styles and new ways of making meaning in contemporary classroom spaces. To understand how to capture in and out-of-school practices, we conducted a qualitative case study of two high school students enrolled in a reading intervention class that incorporated a COTS videogames curriculum. Data were analyzed via a constant comparison analysis. Findings indicated that the games-based curriculum created through a connected learning frame enabled students to engage in a constellation of connections among digital media, traditional texts, peers, and guiding teachers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)16-34
Number of pages19
JournalEducational Media International
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • adolescent literacy
  • commercial-off-the-shelf videogames
  • games-based learning
  • literacy
  • videogames

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Communication

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