Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Leading Change for Sustainability in Schools Simulation: A Research and Development Project

Vien Thong Nguyen, Philip Hallinger, Parinya Showanasai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although a growing number of simulations have been developed for the purpose of educating for sustainability, published reports consist primarily of prescriptive essays, case descriptions, and commentaries rather than empirical studies. Moreover, only a small number of the empirical studies have used experimental designs to assess their effects on learning. This article addressed the need for validated active learning tools that can be used by educators in educating for sustainability. Aim: This article presents the design and initial evaluation of the Leading Change for Sustainability in Schools (LCSS) computer simulation. The study examined the effects of the simulation on student engagement, skills in formulating and executing change management strategies, and the application of knowledge to the simulation challenge. Method: This project employed the research and development method for product design and evaluation. A three-week simulation-based learning intervention was conducted with 32 experienced K-12 school teachers and administrators studying in a Master degree program in Vietnam. The research employed a quasi-experimental, time series design to assessed change in learners’ knowledge and skills following participation in the Leading Change for Sustainability in Schools intervention. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to evaluate week-by-week changes in learning outcomes. Results: The study found that the simulation-based learning module organized around the Leading Change for Sustainability in Schools (Vietnamese version) simulation was highly engaging for students. Students played the simulation an average of 24 times outside of class during the three-week module (18 hours per student). Students’ skills in formulating and executing change strategies for sustainability improved significantly over the three-week module; 28 students reached the highest level of success on the final assessment. Students also demonstrated significant improvement in their ability to incorporate change management principles into their strategies, indicating improvement in higher-order thinking skills.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-81
Number of pages31
JournalSimulation and Gaming
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2024
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • active learning
  • change management
  • education for sustainable development
  • simulation
  • sustainability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Social Sciences
  • Computer Science Applications

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