Enhanced electron transfer using NiCo2O4@C hollow nanocages with an electron-shuttle effect for efficient tetracycline degradation

Yuwen Chen, Ke Zhu, Wenlei Qin, Zhiwei Jiang, Zhuofeng Hu, Mika Sillanpää, Kai Yan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Spinel oxides are recognized as promising Fenton-like catalysts for the degradation of antibiotics. However, the catalytic performance is restrained by the poor electron transfer rate (ETR). Herein, hollow NiCo2O4@C nanocages are rationally designed and prepared to accelerate ETR in peroxymonosulfate (PMS) activation for tetracycline (TC) degradation. Enhanced ETR of the NiCo2O4@C/PMS system is due to three aspects: (1) The hollow nanocage facilitates the diffusion and adsorption of TC, improving the ion transfer at a macroscopic level; (2) Electron reconfiguration in octahedral sites of NiCo2O4 increases the ratio of Co2+, resulting in highly efficient PMS activation; (3) In-situ generated carbon acts as “electron shuttles”, improving the electrical conductivity of catalysts at a microscopic level. As a result, the NiCo2O4@C demonstrates rapid ETR, leading to a high-efficiency activation of PMS. The NiCo2O4@C/PMS system exhibits exceptional TC degradation efficiency and reusability. Non-radical pathway, including 1O2 and direct electron transfer, dominates the system. This work offers a feasible strategy for enhancing electron transfer in the Fenton-like system.

Original languageEnglish
Article number150786
JournalChemical Engineering Journal
Volume488
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 May 2024
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Electron shuttle
  • Electron transfer
  • Peroxymonosulfate
  • Spinel oxide
  • Tetracycline

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Chemistry
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • General Chemical Engineering
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

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