Effect of APOE4 Allele and Gender on the Rate of Atrophy in the Hippo-campus, Entorhinal Cortex, and Fusiform Gyrus in Alzheimer’s Disease

Eid Abo Hamza, Ahmed A. Moustafa, Richard Tindle, Rasu Karki, Shahed Nalla, Mohamed S. Hamid, Mohamad El Haj

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and fusiform gyrus are brain areas that deteriorate during early-stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The ApoE4 allele has been identified as a risk factor for AD development, is linked to an increase in the aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) plaques in the brain, and is responsible for atrophy of the hippocampal area. However, to our knowledge, the rate of deterioration over time in individuals with AD, with or without the ApoE4 allele, has not been investigated. Methods: In this study, we, for the first time, analyze atrophy in these brain structures in AD patients with and without the ApoE4 using the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. Results: It was found that the rate of decrease in the volume of these brain areas over 12 months was related to the presence of ApoE4. Further, we found that neural atrophy was not different for female and male patients, unlike prior studies, suggesting that the presence of ApoE4 is not linked to the gender difference in AD. Conclusion: Our results confirm and extend previous findings, showing that the ApoE4 allele gradual-ly impacts brain regions impacted by AD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)943-953
Number of pages11
JournalCurrent Alzheimer Research
Volume19
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Keywords

  • APOE gene
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • disease progression
  • entorhinal cortex
  • fusiform gyrus
  • gender differences
  • hippocampus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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