Development of a reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) assay for the detection of onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV) in onion cultivars

Rakesh Kumar, Rajendra Prasad Pant, Sonia Kapoor, Anil Khar, Virendra Kumar Baranwal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV) is an important virus affecting Allium species like onion and garlic worldwide. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays are two most commonly used assays for the detection of OYDV but the sensitivity of ELISA is less than that of RT-PCR. PCR based assays are often considered for their sensitivity, specificity but time consuming and require specific technical expertise and costly equipments. To counter these difficulties, a simple and rapid RT-RPA assay for the detection of OYDV was developed. A common set of primer was designed to amplify the coat protein region of OYDV to perform RT-PCR and RT-RPA. Specificity as well as sensitivity test using tenfold serial dilution series of the purified RNA was performed for both the assays. Both symptomatic and asymptomatic samples of different varieties of onion were collected from Delhi NCR region and evaluated for OYDV infection using RT-PCR along with RT-RPA assay. The comparative results have shown that sensitivity of RT-RPA was similar to RT-PCR. However, RT-RPA is simple, and rapid assay for the large scale virus indexing of onion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)201-207
Number of pages7
JournalIndian Phytopathology
Volume74
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Allium species
  • ELISA
  • Onion yellow dwarf virus
  • RT-PCR
  • RT-RPA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science

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