Critical information infrastructure protection: How comprehensive should it be?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

It is a fact that any computer or device connected to the Internet can potentially be infected by malicious software. This paper investigates this risk further, and makes the basic statement that any Internet connected computer in a country should be seen as part of that country's critical information infrastructure protection program because such a computer can be herded into a botnet and used against that country.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationICAST 2013 - 5th International Conference on Adaptive Science and Technology
Subtitle of host publicationThe Future is Now: Adaptive Science and Technology Unbound, Proceedings
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
ISBN (Print)9781479930678
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Event5th International Conference on Adaptive Science and Technology: The Future is Now: Adaptive Science and Technology Unbound, ICAST 2013 - Pretoria, South Africa
Duration: 25 Nov 201327 Nov 2013

Publication series

NameIEEE International Conference on Adaptive Science and Technology, ICAST
ISSN (Print)2326-9413
ISSN (Electronic)2326-9448

Conference

Conference5th International Conference on Adaptive Science and Technology: The Future is Now: Adaptive Science and Technology Unbound, ICAST 2013
Country/TerritorySouth Africa
CityPretoria
Period25/11/1327/11/13

Keywords

  • Critical Information Infrastructure
  • Critical Information Infrastructure Protection
  • Critical Information Systems
  • botnets)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Information Systems
  • Software
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Communication

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