Contribution of psychosocial vulnerability and resilience to academic achievement of primary school children in South Africa

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this article is to explore the contribution of psychosocial vulnerability and resilience to the academic achievement of primary school children attending a low-fee, private, primary school in a township in Gauteng province, South Africa. In poorer communities, family and community challenges can be overwhelming, compromising the capacity of children to engage in education and achieve academically. The study draws on quantitative data from 116 primary school children, plus at least one family member (mostly mothers), including measures of family vulnerability and resilience, child resilience and reading and spelling scores. Vulnerability on its own had little impact on participants' academic achievement. However, the resilience of the child, as perceived by the family member, did impact academic achievement, but only for children with higher levels of vulnerability. This supports the buffering and differential impact theories in resilience. Implications for school social work practice are set out.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)679-687
Number of pages9
JournalChild and Family Social Work
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2022

Keywords

  • academic achievement
  • resilience
  • school social work
  • vulnerability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health (social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science

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