Attitudes of local communities towards marula tree (Sclerocarya birrea subsp. caffra) conservation at the villages of ha-mashau and Ha-Mashamba in Limpopo Province, South Africa

Ndidzulafhi Innocent Sinthumule, Mbuelo Laura Mashau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The marula tree (Sclerocarya birrea subsp. caffra), a common species in sub-Saharan Africa, grows naturally in both protected and communal land. Although considerable research has been undertaken on these trees in southern Africa, to the authors' knowledge, the attitudes of local communities towards the protection of marula trees, particularly in communal land, has not been researched. This study intends to fill this gap in knowledge by examining the attitudes of local people towards conservation of marula trees. Studying the attitudes of people can provide insights on how they behave and how they are willing to coexist with S. birrea. The case study is set in Limpopo Province of South Africa in the villages of Ha-Mashau (Thondoni) and Ha-Mashamba where marula trees grow naturally. To fulfil the aim of this study, door-to-door surveys were carried out in 2018 and questionnaire interviews were used as the main data collection tool in 150 randomly selected households. The study revealed that local communities in the study area had positive attitudes towards conservation of marula trees. Strategies that are used by local communities to protect marula trees in communal land are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number22
JournalResources
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • Attitudes
  • Communities
  • Conservation
  • Marula tree
  • Villages

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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