Antimicrobial resistance profiles of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from meat carcasses and bovine milk in abattoirs and dairy farms of the eastern Cape, South Africa

Abongile Pekana, Ezekiel Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) occasionally threatens the life of the host as a persistent pathogen even though it is normal flora of humans and animals. We characterized drug resistance in S. aureus isolated from animal carcasses and milk samples from the abattoirs and dairy farms in the Eastern Cape Province. Methods: A total of 1000 meat swab samples and 200 raw milk samples were collected from selected abattoirs and dairy farms. S. aureus was isolated and positively identified using biochemical tests and confirmed by molecular methods. An antibiotic susceptibility test was performed on all isolates for 14 antibiotics and correspondent genes were detected. Results: Of the 1200 samples collected, 134 (11.2%) samples were positive for S. aureus. Resistance ranged from 71.6% for penicillin G to 39.2% for tetracycline. A resistance gene (blaZ) was detected in 13 (14.9%), while msrA was found in 31 (52.5%) of S. aureus isolates. Conclusions: The present result shows the potential dissemination of multidrug-resistant S. aureus strains in the dairy farms and abattoirs in the Eastern Cape. Therefore, this implies that the organism may rapidly spread through food and pose serious public health risk.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2223
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume15
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Oct 2018

Keywords

  • Antibiotic resistance genes
  • Antibiotics
  • Meat
  • Raw milk
  • Staphylococcus aureus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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