A Mixed Methods Investigation of Mixed Methods Sampling Designs in Social and Health Science Research

Kathleen M.T. Collins, Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie, Qun G. Jiao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

289 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A sequential design utilizing identical samples was used to classify mixed methods studies via a two-dimensional model, wherein sampling designs were grouped according to the time orientation of each study's components and the relationship of the qualitative and quantitative samples. A quantitative analysis of 121 studies representing nine fields in the social or health sciences revealed that more studies utilized a sampling design that was concurrent (66.1%) than sequential (33.9%). Also, identical sampling designs were the most prevalent, followed by nested sampling, multilevel sampling, and parallel sampling, respectively. Qualitative analysis suggested that across a number of studies the researchers made statistical generalizations that were not sufficiently warranted—culminating in interpretive inconsistency and contributing to crises of representation, legitimation, integration, and politics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-294
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Mixed Methods Research
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • generalization
  • interpretive consistency
  • representation
  • sample size
  • sampling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty

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