A comparative study of pre-service teachers’ knowledge and perceptions of, and attitudes toward, inclusive education

Udeme Samuel Jacob, Jace Pillay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined pre-service teachers’ knowledge and perceptions of, and attitudes toward, inclusive education. A total of 131 pre-service teachers from two programs—one at a College of Education and a university program through the Faculty of Education—were surveyed using a cross-sectional survey research design. Data were collected using a self-developed questionnaire. The questionnaire was pilot tested among pre-service teachers from the Faculty of Education at a university which did not participate in the study. We used a 3 × 2 factorial multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) to analyze the descriptive and inferential data (means, standard deviations). The study revealed a statistically significant difference between pre-service teachers’ gender (male and female) and programs (university and college of education) regarding their knowledge and perceptions of, and attitudes toward, inclusive education. The results indicated a significant MANOVA. In the follow-up analysis of the variance test, pre-service teachers’ perceptions and attitudes differed between genders and programs. In addition, the study found a significant difference between pre-service teachers’ perceptions and attitudes toward inclusive education based on their educational programs. Pre-service teachers from the College of Education scored higher than those from the Faculty of Education at a university. We discuss the implications of an egalitarian learning environment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1012797
JournalFrontiers in Education
Volume7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Oct 2022

Keywords

  • attitudes
  • inclusive education
  • knowledge
  • perceptions
  • pre-service teachers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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